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Showing 10 posts tagged DOL.

Department of Labor Issues Guidance for Employers – Paid Leave Provisions Take Effect April 1st

On March 24th, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued guidance for employers and employees as to how they will be affected by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) when it takes effect on April 1, 2020. The guidance came in the form of an introductory statement, a fact sheet for employers, a fact sheet for employees, and a Q&A sheet that covers a wide variety of situations.   More >

IRS, Department of Labor, and Treasury Outline Workings of Paid Leave Tax Credits

The Department of Labor, IRS and Treasury Department have released a joint notice outlining how employers may utilize tax credits to provide mandated paid leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act signed into law on March 18th. The paid leave provisions have been discussed in our summary of the new law here, and these three agencies have now provided a glimpse of the road map for employers to cover the costs of paid leave. While the actual guidance is slated to be issued this week, the notice included information about how these provisions will operate: More >

ALERT: NEW E-DELIVERY RULES FOR ERISA PENSION PLANS ON THE HORIZON

In October, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published a proposed rule that encourages electronic delivery of ERISA-required plan disclosures. It allows plan administrators to post disclosures online to cut costs of paper delivery and is a voluntary safe harbor that plans can use to make documents accessible on a website instead of mailing paper documents. More >

Alert: Department of Labor Releases Final Rule on Overtime; Salary Threshold Raised

On Tuesday, September 24, 2019, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a Final Rule that raises the salary threshold for exemption from overtime pay to $35,568 per year. This rule was proposed in March of 2019, and it appears that the Final Rule is substantially similar. This Final Rule follows years of uncertainty after an overtime overhaul put in place under the Obama administration was held up in the courts and ultimately scrapped. More >

ALERT: Chad C. Brown, Inc. and Horse Trainer Chad Brown must pay $1.6M in Department of Labor Wage and Hour Violations Investigation

In a development that should make every horse operation in Kentucky stand up and take notice, trainer Chad Brown will pay $1.6 million to cover back wages, liquidated damages and civil penalties for what the Department of Labor (“DOL”) considers to be willful violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and the H-2B non-immigrant visa program. More >

Overtime Law Update – One Rule Stalled, One Law Gaining Momentum

In 2015 and 2016, the Obama administration’s Department of Labor (“DOL”) released proposed and final rules that were set to dramatically change the face of overtime exemptions by raising the threshold salary requirement to around $47,500.  The Final Rule became effective as of December 1st, 2016, but several contemporaneous events have worked to upend the new regulation, and changes are afoot even now with respect to overtime. It’s time to take a quick look at the status of overtime regulations. More >

ALERT – Federal Court Blocks Overtime Rule

Breaking newsThe impending change to federal overtime regulations has been put on hold by the U.S. District Court in the Eastern District of Texas. The court granted a nationwide preliminary injunction against the Department of Labor’s implementation of the rule, as the rule faces challenges from 21 states.  More >

ALERT – DOL Issues Final Overtime Rule

The Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued the long-awaited Final Rule on overtime exemptions on Wednesday, May 18, 2016, providing hard numbers and a plan for incremental increases to the “white collar” salary exemption. More >

DOL Quietly Moves to ‘All Liquidated Damages, All the Time’ Footing

The Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) has always provided for liquidated damages for violations, but in the past, the Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) generally pursued the liquidated damages only when forced to litigate. Liquidated damages are effectively punitive in nature and amount to the full amount of back wages, doubling the hit to employers who find themselves in such a predicament. In recent years, however, the WHD has steadily increased the frequency with which it assesses these damages, which proves to be double the burden on employers. More >

New Overtime Rules May Be Here Sooner than Expected

The timeline for adoption of the Final Rule of proposed changes to the white collar overtime exemption has been hard to pin down. In early November of 2015, Solicitor of Labor M. Patricia Smith, during a panel discussion at the American Bar Association’s Labor and Employment Law Conference in Philadelphia, mentioned that the proposed changes would not be issued until late 2016, leading many to believe that they would not take effect until 2017. Later that month, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) Wage and Hour Division estimated that the rule would be published in July 2016, not quite as late as earlier implied. Then, Labor Secretary Thomas Perez stated in December in an interview with Bloomberg BNA that it seemed likely to him that the new rule would be out by spring of 2016. In February of 2016, Smith reiterated the Wage and Hour Division’s projected timeline of a July 2016 publication with an effective date 60 days later. On March 14th, 2016, the Department of Labor made the surprising move of sending its overtime rule to the White House Office of Management and Budget (“OMB”), which means that all bets are off and the rule may here sooner than predicted. More >

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