Lobbying Affiliate: MML&K Government Solutions
{ Banner Image }

Employment Law Blog

When It Comes To Employment Issues, Choose A Firm That Thinks Outside the Cubicle.

Contact Us

250 Character(s) Remaining
Type the following characters: three, papa, whisky, six, romeo, mike

* Indicates a required field.

Categories

McBrayer Blogs

Showing 45 posts in Employment Discrimination Laws.

EEOC Updates Guidance on COVID-19 and ADA

Posted In Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA"), COVID-19, EEOC, Employment Discrimination Laws

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has issued updates providing guidance for employers in response to new developments and information. This week, the EEOC has issued a new technical assistance update, clarifying the circumstances under which the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Rehabilitation Act may be applied to COVID-19. More >

Long-Term COVID Effects May Qualify as a Disability under the ADA—What Employers Need to Know

Posted In Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA"), Coronavirus, COVID-19, Employment Discrimination Laws

For more on this subject, view our webinar, Myths, Masks, and Mandates: More Advice for the Continuing Workplace Challenges of COVID-19.

We are still learning more about the virus, including its long-term effects on those who have been infected. Because of the severity of these long-lasting symptoms, both the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) and Department of Justice (“DOJ”) recently released guidance stating that “long COVID” may qualify as a disability under anti-discrimination laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). An employer must remain aware of the long-term effects that COVID can have on its workforce and potential accommodations that its employees may need.  More >

EEOC Updates Compliance Manual on Religious Discrimination

Posted In Employment Discrimination Laws, Religious Employer, Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act

Recently, the EEOC released updated guidance for employers regarding religious discrimination and accommodations in the Compliance Manual Section on Religious Discrimination. The updates override the previous iteration of the manual published in 2008. Importantly, this manual does not bind employers by law, but it does inform the way that the EEOC processes claims under the law and is therefore a crucial resource for employers.  With these updates, the EEOC clarified an important aspect of religious discrimination: who is protected by the Title VII. More >

SCOTUS Rules On Landmark LGBTQ+ Workplace Protections

Posted In Adverse Employment Action, Employee Training, Employment Discrimination Laws, U.S. Supreme Court

A landmark decision was handed down by the Supreme Court of the United States on June 15, 2020. In a 6-3 ruling, the Court found that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which protects employees from discrimination based on sex, also extends protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. This decision is historic for LGBTQ+ employees. More >

Coronavirus and Employers: Critical Compliance Information

Posted In Coronavirus, Employment Discrimination Laws, Employment Law, Sick Employees

As the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, has reached global pandemic status, it is critical for employers to understand how to administer their workforce in the face of the new illness, especially in light of state and federal employment laws. Luckily for employers, there is fresh guidance from several agencies on how to put team health first while protecting businesses and complying with relevant workforce laws and regulations. We have distilled that information into key points set out below. More >

EEOC Issues Fact Sheet on Transgender Restroom Access

Posted In EEOC, Employment Discrimination Laws, Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act

On Monday, May 2nd, 2016, the EEOC issued a fact sheet entitled “Fact Sheet: Bathroom Access Rights for Transgender Employees Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.” The fact sheet comports with the agency’s stance that Title VII protects gender identity under the prohibitions on discrimination based on sex and serves as a reminder to employers that federal law – and the EEOC’s interpretation of it – trumps state law on this issue, despite recent attention-grabbing media headlines.  More >

EEOC: Title VII Prohibits Employment Discrimination Based On Sexual Orientation

The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges struck down restrictions on marriage by same-sex couples, but it did not address other forms of discrimination based on sexual orientation, such as in employment. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, however, did not wait for a ruling from the high court, instead ruling on its own that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prevents discrimination in an employment context on the basis of sexual orientation. This decision, Baldwin v. Foxx,[1] broadens Title VII protections considerably, although it remains to be seen if the high court agrees with the EEOC interpretation. More >

The Obergefell Decision and Employers

The recent United States Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges significantly altered the legal landscape with respect to same-sex marriages, finding that the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution requires all states to both license in-state same-sex marriages and recognize valid same-sex marriages performed out-of-state. The Court did not, however, go so far as to reach issues such as discrimination in employment or public accommodation. So, while legal same-sex marriage is the law of the land, those newly-married couples may face legal uncertainty when it comes to discrimination in public accommodations or their place of employment, unless contravening state law applies. That said, there are still several ways that the Obergefell decision and its counterpart, United States v. Windsor, will affect employers and employees. More >

“Too Black”: Waitress’s Claim of Color Bias Raises Novel Title VII Claim

Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prevents discrimination in employment decisions based upon an employee’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Bias claims based on a claimant’s skin color are nearly unanimously predicated upon bias against ‘race’ rather than ‘color.’ Circumstances can arise, as the Fifth Circuit found, where ‘color,’ rather than ‘race,’ is a discrete type of alleged discrimination. In a novel holding, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit ruled in Etienne v. Spanish Lake Truck & Casino Plaza, LLC that a separate claim of ‘color’ can provide the necessary foundation for a claim of discrimination based on ‘race.’ More >

Employment at Will Comes with Many Exceptions

Kentucky employment law generally recognizes that most employment is “at-will” – meaning, employees serve at the pleasure of the employer, and termination of an employee does not require “just cause.” There are several circumstances, however, where laws and other factors prohibit employers from terminating an employee without a well-documented showing of cause. Employers should be aware of the circumstances under which they may not terminate an employee without just cause. More >

Lexington, KYLouisville, KYFrankfort, KY: MML&K Government SolutionsWashington, D.C.