Lobbying Affiliate: MML&K Government Solutions
{ Banner Image }

Employment Law Blog

When It Comes To Employment Issues, Choose A Firm That Thinks Outside the Cubicle.

Contact Us

250 Character(s) Remaining
Type the following characters: romeo, whisky, papa, romeo

* Indicates a required field.

Categories

McBrayer Blogs

Showing 240 posts in Employment Law.

Fourth Circuit Rules That Gender Dysphoria Is Not Excluded by ADA

Earlier this week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit ruled that gender dysphoria is not to be excluded from the broad definition of “disability” laid out in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This decision may signal a new direction for discrimination law, and employers should be aware of its impacts. More >

Does Your COVID Testing Program Pass the Test? – EEOC Updates COVID Guidance for Employers

Posted In COVID-19, EEOC, Employer Mandate, Employment Law

After nearly two and a half years of constantly evolving standards for handling COVID in the workplace, it is no surprise that the EEOC has updated its guidance once again. The most significant change in guidance applies to testing employees for COVID, and employers should be aware of this shift in order to maintain compliance. More >

Beat the Heat with a Workplace Safety Plan

This summer is proving to be another hot one in many parts of the country, which means the odds of workplace illnesses and injuries relating to excessive temperatures are much higher. In April, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced a National Emphasis Program focused on addressing workplace heat hazards, which will entail OSHA conducting inspections to identify heat-related hazards in workplaces both indoors and outdoors. Employers should have a plan to avoid liability for heat-related illnesses and to be prepared should such an inspection occur. More >

An Employer's Guide to Intermittent FMLA Leave

Through the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), certain employees are entitled to 12 work weeks of unpaid leave under specific medical or family circumstances, such as parental leave or a serious health condition. In some cases, employees eligible under FMLA take their 12 weeks of leave all at once. However, FMLA does not require leave to be used in a single block. Employees with qualifying circumstances may take their allotted leave in smaller increments that amount to as much as 12 work weeks over a 12-month period—but this “intermittent leave” can cause numerous headaches for employers. It’s important for employers to understand how intermittent leave works and how to best handle its effects in the workplace. More >

School's Out, Work's In--Considerations for Seasonal Employment

Posted In Employment Law, Minors

As summer approaches, many businesses will be thinking about hiring seasonal employees. Whether those are high schoolers looking for pocket change, college students in need of internship credits, or just more sets of hands to assist with the busy months, specific considerations need to be made for your seasonal workers to assure legal compliance. More >

NLRB GC Seeks to End Captive Audience Meetings

In yet another bid to weaken employers’ stance in the face of organized labor, NLRB General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo has issued a memo calling for an end to employer-led “captive audience” meetings. This move by the NLRB threatens one of employers’ key tools for curbing unionization in the workplace and is yet another foreboding sign of the Biden administration’s pro-labor agenda. More >

EEOC Updates Caregiver Guidance for Employers

Posted In COVID-19, EEOC, Employment Law

Though we are now two years into the pandemic, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is still not finished issuing COVID-related guidance for employers. The Commission’s latest statement involves issues of bias regarding employees with caregiver responsibilities, especially such responsibilities relating to or resulting from the pandemic. Employers should be aware of how caregiver bias may manifest itself and how to avoid illegal discrimination per new EEOC guidance. More >

Boeing, Boeing, Gone! NLRB GC Recommends Reversal of Employer Handbook Standards

With any new administration in Washington comes changes to the National Labor Relations Board. From the start, Biden’s NLRB has made clear their goal to reverse the employer-friendly handbook standards established by the Boeing decision, and the General Counsel’s March 7th post-hearing brief includes recommendations that take further steps towards that goal. More >

Employer Update: Keeping Up with COVID

Posted In COVID-19, Employment Law, Mandatory vaccination policies

Nearly two full years into the pandemic, employers are still struggling to keep up with ever-evolving guidance, requirements, and recommendations regarding the virus—and for good reason, as the advice for how to keep employees safe while staying in business has been constantly evolving.  As the Omicron variant creates even more problems, some employers are suffering now more than ever. We have rounded up crucial updates for employers so you can handle the ongoing impacts of the pandemic to the best of your ability. More >

Lexington, KYLouisville, KYFrankfort, KY: MML&K Government SolutionsWashington, D.C.